The next time you are apartment hunting, don’t forget to bring a resume…for your pet. A resume for your dog might sound like a silly concept, but it could make it a lot easier to find the right place to live.

Pet resumes help convince landlords to bend their no pet policies because they provide proof that your pet won’t become the horror story they’re afraid of. Landlords don’t instate no pet rules because they hate pets, they may even have a pet at home! They’re afraid that your pet will leave a mess behind when you leave and they’ll be left with the hefty price tag.

It’s important to treat your pet’s resume as seriously as you would treat your own. It’s funny to say that your pet’s career is to bark at every lizard that scurries past on the sidewalk, but a noisy pet will not earn you any points with a potential landlord. Landlord’s main concern is that their investment will be protected. If you show your pet respect, your potential landlord may follow suit.

Your pet’s resume should actually look a lot like yours.

 

Use our resume builder to help build a resume for your pet.

Select one of the following three options, or use our general form below:

General Dog Cat Miscellaneous Pet Resume Builder

Save Resume

Contact Information

Your name and contact information at the top of the resume.

Pet's Name Dog's Name Cats's Name Pet's Name
Species
Owner's Name
Phone Number
Email

Pet Photo

Include an irresistible photo of your pet. Photos with kids and photos out at the park are great examples. A photo with a child showcases that your pet is well mannered and friendly. A photo at the park tells the landlord that you’re a good owner because you take your pet out to play. Tiring out your pet at the park means they won’t have the energy to bark loudly or wreak havoc in the apartment. If you do not have a photo like this, make sure that the photo you use for your pet wins over the landlord’s affection. A photo of Fido with a chewed up pillow is a great laugh, but it will not be seen as a positive in your landlord’s eyes.

Include an irresistible photo of your dog. Photos with kids and photos out at the park are great examples. A photo with a child showcases that your dog is well mannered and friendly. A photo at the park tells the landlord that you’re a good owner because you take your dog out to play, which tires your dog out and means they won’t have the energy to bark loudly or wreak havoc in the apartment later that day. If you do not have a photo like this, make sure that the photo you use wins over the landlord’s affection. A photo of Fido with a chewed up pillow is a great laugh, but it will not be seen as a positive in your landlord’s eyes.

Include an irresistible photo of your cat. Photos with kids and photos out at the park are great examples. A photo with a child showcases that your cat is well mannered and friendly. Photos in the park show the landlord that Fluffy is well exercised and will not have the energy to wreak havoc at home. If you do not have a photo like this, make sure that the photo you use for your cat wins over the landlord’s affection. A photo of Fluffy with a ripped up curtain is a great laugh, but it will not be seen as a positive in your landlord’s eyes.

Include an irresistible photo of your pet. Photos with kids and photos out at the park are great examples. A photo with a child showcases that your pet is well mannered and friendly. A photo at the park tells the landlord that you’re a good owner because you take your pet out to play. Tiring out your pet at the park means they won’t have the energy to bark loudly or wreak havoc in the apartment. If you do not have a photo like this, make sure that the photo you use for your pet wins over the landlord’s affection. A photo of your pet with a chewed up pillow is a great laugh, but it will not be seen as a positive in your landlord’s eyes.

Your Pet's Photo

Training

You’d include where you’ve graduated from in the Education section; your pet should too! You’d actually use this section for information about Training classes that fuzzy friend has completed.

You’d include where you’ve graduated from in the Education section; Fido should too! You’d actually use this section for information about Training classes that your dog has completed.

  • Has your dog had any obedience training?
    • Does your dog do refresher trainings?
    • If your dog hasn’t been to obedience training, consider enrolling! Tell your landlord that your dog will be a perfectly behaved tenant before move in.
  • Does your dog use a pad or go outside?
    • How do you clean up after your dog’s messes? No landlord wants to find an unexpected surprise on the bottom of his or her shoe or slip in fall because your puppy peed in the hall.

You’d include where you’ve graduated from in the Education section; your cat should too! You’d actually use this section for information about Training classes that fuzzy friend has completed.

  • Has your cat had any obedience training?
    • Does your cat do refresher trainings?
    • Offer to enroll your cat in any additional trainings your landlord may be preferential to.
    • f your cat hasn’t been to obedience training, consider enrolling! Tell your landlord that your cat will be a perfectly behaved tenant before move in.
  • Does your cat use a litter box or go outside?
    • How do you clean up after your cat’s messes?
  • Is your cat trained to scratch posts or mats?
    • Landlords want to know that your cat won’t be inclined to scratch up their walls or flooring. Your cat knows better.

You’d include where you’ve graduated from in the education section; your pet should too! You’d actually use this section for information about training classes that fuzzy friend has completed.

  • Obedience training:
    • Does your pet do refresher trainings?
    • Offer to enroll your pet in any additional trainings your landlord may be preferential to.
    • If your pet hasn’t been to obedience training, consider enrolling! Tell your landlord that your pet will be a perfectly behaved tenant before move in.
  • How do you clean up after your pet’s messes?
Training

Experience

But what has Mr. Mittens done that adds to his resume? He may sit on your keyboard a lot, but that doesn’t mean he’s making spread sheets or writing memos. Your pet has a different kind of experience than you do.

  • Has your pet lived in an apartment or rental setting before? Is he or she used to it? Was it similar to this apartment?
  • What makes this apartment a good fit for your pet?
  • What characteristics of your pet’s breed make it a “good tenant”?
  • Does your pet have characteristics that make him or her suitable for city living?
  • What vaccinations does your pet have?
  • Is your pet certified as a service animal? It’s definitely not a requirement, but it is an additional testament to good behavior.

But what has Fido done that adds to his resume? He may nudge your computer off the couch sometimes, but that doesn’t mean he’s making spread sheets or writing memos. Your dog may not have typical resume experience, but your dog has done noteworthy things, whether you know it or not.

  • Has your dog lived in an apartment or rental setting before? Is he or she used to it? Was it similar to this apartment?
  • What makes this apartment a good fit for your dog?
  • What characteristics of your dog’s breed make it a “good tenant”?
    • Is your dog easy on people with allergies?
    • Does your dog play well with other animals?
    • Is your dog resistant to shedding?
  • Does your dog have characteristics that make it suitable for city living?
  • What vaccinations does your dog have?
  • Certify your Dog through the American Kennel Club’s Canine Good Citizen Program! This certificate proves to your landlord that your dog has manners at home and in the community.
  • Is your dog certified as a service animal? It’s definitely not a requirement, but it is an additional testament to good behavior.

But what has Mr. Mittens done that adds to his resume? He may sit on your keyboard a lot, but that doesn’t mean he’s making spread sheets or writing memos. Your cat has a different kind of experience than you do.

  • Has your cat lived in an apartment or rental setting before? Is it used to it? Was it similar to this apartment?
  • What makes this apartment a good fit for your cat?
  • What characteristics of your cat’s breed make it a “good tenant”?
    • Is your cat easy on people with allergies?
    • Does your cat play well with other animals? Loud cat fights outside are not characteristics of a good tenant, your landlord will be happy to hear it won’t happen with Mr. Mittens.
  • Does your cat have characteristics that make him or her suitable for city living?
  • What vaccinations does your cat have?

But what has your done that adds to his resume? Your pet has a different kind of experience than you do.

  • Has your pet lived in an apartment or rental setting before? Is it used to it?Was it similar to this apartment?
  • What makes this apartment a good fit for your pet?
  • What characteristics of your pet’s breed make it a “good tenant”?
    • Is your pet easy on people with allergies?
    • Does your pet play well with other animals?
    • Is your pet resistant to shedding? Reptiles don’t have any fur at all!
  • Does your pet have characteristics that make it suitable for city living?
  • What vaccinations does your pet have?
Experience

Community Service (optional)

If your pet has done any of these things, it will definitely impress your landlord.

  • Has your pet given blood to other pets?
  • Has your pet volunteered to play with sick children or anyone in need?
  • Is your dog a part of any therapy dog programs?
  • Are you a member of any animal protection organizations?

If your dog has done any of these things, it will definitely impress your landlord.

  • Has your dog given blood to other dogs?
  • Has your dog volunteered to play with sick children or anyone in need?
  • Is your dog a part of any therapy dog programs?
  • Are you a member of any animal protection organizations?

If your cat has done any of these things, it will definitely impress your landlord.

  • Has your cat given blood to other cats?
  • Has your cat volunteered to play with sick children or anyone in need?
  • Are you a member of any animal protection organizations?

If your pet has done any of these things, it will definitely impress your landlord.

  • Has your pet given blood to other pets?
  • Has your pet volunteered to play with sick children or anyone in need?
  • Are you a member of any animal protection organizations?
Community Service (optional)

About Your Pet Dog Cat Pet

  • How old is your pet?
  • How long have you owned your pet?
  • Are you your pet’s first owner?
  • How much does your pet weigh?
  • What’s your pet’s breed?
  • Does your pet shed?
  • Is your pet an indoor or outdoor pet?
  • How does your pet react to loud noises like thunder?
  • What are your pet’s favorite at home activities?
  • What do you love about your pet? Feel free to provide any examples of great behavior.
  • How old is your dog?
    • If your dog is older, the landlord won’t have to worry about a rambunctious puppy making noise for other tenants.
  • How long have you owned your dog?
  • Are you your dog’s first owner?
    • Who owned your dog before you? Where did you purchase your dog
  • How much does your dog weigh?
  • What’s your dog’s breed?
    • Is your dog purebred?
  • How long is your dog’s hair length?
    • Does your dog shed? How do you clean up after shed hair?
  • How does your dog react to loud noises like thunder?
  • What are your dog’s favorite at home activities?
    • Does your dog spend the day sleeping or watching TV?
  • What do you love about your dog? Feel free to provide examples of great behavior. Has your dog alerted you that an elderly family member fell in the middle of the night? Has your dog saved anyone from a fire? While these examples are outrageously good, smaller examples work too!
  • How old is your cat?
    • If your cat is older, the landlord won’t have to worry about a rambunctious kitten tearing through the curtains pre-installed in the room.
  • How long have you owned your cat?
  • Are you your cat’s first owner?
    • Who owned your cat before you? Where did you purchase your cat?
  • How much does your cat weigh?
  • What’s your cat’s breed?
    • Is your cat purebred?
  • How long is your cat’s hair length?
    • Does your cat shed?
    • How do you clean up after shed hair?
  • Is your cat an indoor or outdoor cat?
    • If your cat is a cat, keeping it indoors prevents cat fights outside the building.
  • How does your cat react to loud noises like thunder?
  • What are your cat’s favorite at home activities?
    • Does your cat like to cuddle up in the sink bowl and catch dripping water? What can the landlord expect Fluffy to be doing when you’re not watching.
  • What do you love about your cat? Feel free to provide examples of any great behavior.
  • How old is your pet?
    • If your pet is older, the landlord won’t have to worry about a rambunctious, and noisy pet bothering the neighbors.
  • How long have you owned your pet?
  • Are you your pet’s first owner?
    • Who owned your pet before you? Where did you purchase your pet?
  • How much does your pet weigh?
  • What’s your pet’s breed?
  • How long is your pet’s hair length?
    • Does your pet shed?
    • How do you clean up after shed hair?
  • How does your pet react to loud noises like thunder?
  • What are your pet’s favorite at home activities?
    • Does your hamster like to run around in his wheel until he’s blue in the face? Your landlord wants to know what your pet is doing at home.
  • What do you love about your pet? Feel free to provide any examples of great behavior.
About

How I Care for My Pet Dog Cat Pet

Here’s where you should brag about your relationship with your pet and what a good owner you are. You reflect on your pet, show your landlord how good of an owner you are, and they’re more likely to be lenient.

  • Do you and your pet have a bedtime routine?
  • How do you prevent against fleas, ticks and other parasites?
  • Where will your pet be groomed and how often? Be specific.
  • Do you have tags on your pet’s collar and or a microchip?
  • Is your pet spayed or neutered?
  • Is your pet registered with your county?
  • Who will your veterinarian be?
  • How often does your pet need to be walked or exercised?
  • Where will you take your pet to exercise in the new neighborhood?
  • How will your pet be taken care of while you’re at work, vacation or school?

Here’s where you should brag about your relationship with your dog and what a good owner you are. You reflect on your dog, show your landlord how good of an owner you are, and they’re more likely to be lenient.

  • Do you and your dog have a bedtime routine?
    • Your landlord wants to know if your dog is used to using the bathroom at certain times at night and in the morning. Your landlord wants to be sure that Fido won’t slip up on the carpet while you’re asleep. Your landlord also wants to know the latest time your dog could bark.
  • How do you prevent against fleas, ticks and other parasites?
    • Does your dog wear a flea collar, take a pill or use a gel?
      • Which brands of these do you use for your dog?
  • Where will your dog be groomed and how often? Be specific.
    • Well-groomed dogs don’t shed as much and they don’t dirty your landlord’s property.
    • Do you groom your dog between visits to the groomer? What do you do?
  • Do you have tags on your dog’s collar?
  • Do you have a microchip in your dog?
  • Is your dog spayed or neutered?
    • Landlords don’t want to worry about a litter of puppies being born on the carpet or any of the other details of your dog’s sex life.
  • Is your pet registered with your county?
  • Who will your veterinarian be? If you’re relocating and need a new one, give your landlord contact information. Your landlord wants to make sure that your dog isn’t going to bring disease into the property.
    • What are your dog’s teeth like? Are they sharp for biting other tenants?
  • How often does your dog need to be walked or exercised?
    • If you take your dog to the park daily or for several walks a day, your landlord will be happy to know that your dog is too tired to wreak havoc in the apartment or make loud noises.
  • Where will you take your dog to exercise in the new neighborhood?
  • How will your dog be taken care of while you’re at work, vacation or school?
    • Do you have a local dog walker you plan to hire? Will you leave your dog at a family member’s home? If you answered yes to any of these questions, let your potential landlord know! Give your landlord contact information for the person!
    • Do you leave your dog in a cage or have free range of the apartment?
    • Leaving a dog at home for a vacation could result in a huge mess the landlord doesn’t want to deal with or a dog howling by the door in the days leading up to your return. While you leaving your dog at a home alone for a vacation probably isn’t likely, your landlord has heard horror stories and doesn’t want to live through them. Give your landlord every reassurance needed.
  • Offer to add extra rugs to the apartment to protect flooring.

Here’s where you should brag about your relationship with your cat and what a good owner you are. You reflect on your cat, show your landlord how good of an owner you are, and they’re more likely to be lenient.

  • How do you prevent against fleas, ticks and other parasites?
    • Does your cat wear a flea collar, take a pill or use a gel?
      • Which brands of these do you use for your cat?
  • Where will your cat be groomed and how often? Be specific.
    • Well-groomed cats don’t shed as much and they don’t dirty your landlord’s property.
    • Do you groom your cat between visits to the groomer? What do you do?
  • Do you have tags on your cat’s collar?
  • Do you have a microchip in your cat?
  • Is your pet registered with your county?
  • Is your cat spayed or neutered?
    • Landlords don’t want to worry about kittens being born on the carpet or any of the other details of your cat’s sex life.
  • Who will your veterinarian be? If you’re relocating and need a new one, give your landlord contact information. Your landlord wants to make sure that your cat isn’t going to bring disease into the property.
    • What are your cat’s teeth like? Are they sharp for biting other tenants? What about your cat’s claws?
  • How often does your cat need to be walked or exercised?
    • If you take your cat to the park daily or for several walks a day, your landlord will be happy to know that your cat is too tired to wreak havoc in the apartment or make loud noises.
  • Where will you take your cat to exercise in the new neighborhood?
  • Let your landlord know if you have renter’s insurance that covers cats. If you don’t have it, be sure to let them know if you’re willing to invest in it. Also offer to put down an additional cat deposit.
  • How will your cat be taken care of while you’re at work, vacation or school?
    • Will you leave your cat at a family member’s home? Let your potential landlord know! Give your landlord contact information for the person!
    • Leaving a cat at home for a vacation could result in a huge mess the landlord doesn’t want to deal with. While you leaving your cat at a home alone for a vacation probably isn’t likely, your landlord has heard horror stories and doesn’t want to live through them. Give your landlord every reassurance needed.
    • Do you leave your cat in a cage or have free range of the apartment?
  • How often do you clip your cat’s nails to prevent scratching?

Here’s where you should brag about your relationship with your pet and what a good owner you are. You reflect on your pet, show your landlord how good of an owner you are, and they’re more likely to be lenient.

  • Do you and your pet have a bedtime routine?
    • Your landlord wants to know if your pet is used to using the bathroom at certain times at night and in the morning.
  • How do you prevent against fleas, ticks and other parasites?
    • Does your pet wear a flea collar, take a pill or use a gel?
      • Which brands of these do you use for your pet?
  • Where will your pet be groomed and how often? Be specific.
    • Well-groomed pets don’t shed as much and they don’t dirty your landlord’s property.
    • Do you groom your pet between visits to the groomer? What do you do?
  • Do you have tags on your pet’s collar?
  • Do you have a microchip in your pet?
  • Is your pet registered with your county?
  • Is your pet spayed or neutered?
    • Landlords don’t want to worry about a your pet giving birth on the carpet or any of the other details of your pet’s sex life.
    • If you did have your pet fixed, it also provides evidence that you’re a responsible owner. An unfixed pet can have lots of consequences for your pet’s health.
  • Who will your veterinarian be? If you’re relocating and need a new one, give your landlord contact information. Your landlord wants to make sure that your pet isn’t going to bring disease into the property.
    • What are your pet’s teeth like? Are they sharp for biting other tenants?
  • How often does your pet need to be walked or exercised?
    • If you take your pet to the park daily or for several walks a day, your landlord will be happy to know that your pet is too tired to wreak havoc in the apartment or make loud noises.
  • Where will you take your pet to exercise in the new neighborhood?
  • Let your landlord know if you have renter’s insurance that covers pets. If you don’t have it, be sure to let them know if you’re willing to invest in it. Also offer to put down an additional pet deposit.
  • How will your pet be taken care of while you’re at work, vacation or school?
    • Will you leave your pet at a family member’s home? If you answered yes to any of these questions, let your potential landlord know! Give your landlord contact information for the person!
    • Do you leave your pet in a cage or do you let your pet have free range of the apartment?
    • Leaving a pet at home for a vacation could result in a huge mess the landlord doesn’t want to deal with. While you leaving your pet at a home alone for a vacation probably isn’t likely, your landlord has heard horror stories and doesn’t want to live through them. Give your landlord every reassurance needed.
  • Offer to add extra rugs to the apartment to protect flooring.
  • How will you bunny proof the apartment?
    • Bunnies love to chew on things!
How I Care for

Skills

Include anything that you feel makes your pet great!

  • Does your pet sit, speak or respond to any other requests on command?
  • Anything of this nature works!

Include anything that you feel makes your dog great!

  • Does your dog sit, speak or respond to any other requests on command?
  • Does your dog respond to its name?
  • Does your dog get your slippers for you in the morning?
  • Anything of this nature works!

Include anything that you feel makes your cat great!

  • Does your cat respond to its name?
  • Does your cat kill mice or other pests? If Fluffy is a free exterminator, she adds value to the property for the landlord.
  • Anything of this nature works!

Include anything that you feel makes your pet great!

    Does your pet speak or respond to any other requests on command?

    Does your pet respond to its name?

    Does your pet kill mice or other pests?

    Anything of this nature works!

Skills

References

These are the most important part of your pet’s resume. It’s not that your landlord thinks you’re lying about everything in this resume, it’s that you could be. If what you say is true, additional sources will confirm it. Make sure that you get in contact with these references ahead of time to make sure that they remember your pet. Make sure they know how long they’ve known your pet and remind them not to tell any funny stories that could hurt you in the long run.

These are the most important part of your dog’s resume. It’s not that your landlord thinks you’re lying about everything in this resume, it’s that you could be. If what you say is true, additional sources will confirm it. Make sure that you get in contact with these references ahead of time to make sure that they remember your dog. Make sure they know how long they’ve known your dog and remind them not to tell any funny stories that could hurt you in the long run.

  • Veterinarians
  • Past landlords who can testify that your dog left the apartment as clean as it was received.
  • Past neighbors who can assure your potential landlord that they haven’t heard a peep out of Waldo for the five years they’ve lived next to you. Landlords don’t want other tenants complaining.
  • Groomers who can let your potential landlord know that even while getting up close and personal in Spike’s face, he never snapped, tried to bite or claw at them.
  • Dog walkers who can promise the landlord that Spot does all of his business outdoors during walks.
  • Dog trainers
  • Anyone who has watched over your dog in the past who can testify to your dog’s good behavior.

These are the most important part of your cat’s resume. It’s not that your landlord thinks you’re lying about everything in this resume, it’s that you could be. If what you say is true, additional sources will confirm it. Make sure that you get in contact with these references ahead of time to make sure that they remember your cat. Make sure they know how long they’ve known your cat and remind them not to tell any funny stories that could hurt you in the long run.

  • Veterinarians
  • Past landlords who can testify that your cat left the apartment as clean as it was received.
  • Past neighbors who can assure your potential landlord that they haven’t heard a peep out of Fluffy for the five years they’ve lived next to you. Landlords don’t want other tenants complaining.
  • Groomers who can let your potential landlord know that even while getting up close and personal in Fluffy’s face, he never snapped, tried to bite or claw at them..
  • Cat trainers
  • Anyone who has watched over your cat in the past who can testify to your cat’s good behavior.

These are the most important part of your pet’s resume. It’s not that your landlord thinks you’re lying about everything in this resume, it’s that you could be. If what you say is true, additional sources will confirm it. Make sure that you get in contact with these references ahead of time to make sure that they remember your pet. Make sure they know how long they’ve known your pet and remind them not to tell any funny stories that could hurt you in the long run.

  • Veterinarians
  • Past landlords who can testify that your pet left the apartment as clean as it was received.
  • Past neighbors who can assure your potential landlord that they haven’t heard a peep out of Polly the Parrot for the five years they’ve lived next to you. Landlords don’t want other tenants complaining.
  • Groomers who can let your potential landlord know that even while getting up close and personal in your pet’s face, it never snapped, tried to bite or claw at them.
  • Pet trainers
  • Anyone who has watched over your pet in the past who can testify to your pet’s good behavior.
Name
Title
Phone Number
Email
Add Reference

Close with a request for an interview

If your landlord says yes, make sure that your pet is tired out from a long walk or trip to the park. You don’t want this tactic to be counterproductive if your pet is loud or unruly!

If your landlord says yes, make sure that your dog is tired out from a long walk. You don’t want this tactic to be counterproductive if your dog is loud or unruly!

If your landlord says yes, make sure that your cat is tired out from a long walk. You don’t want this tactic to be counterproductive if your cat is loud or unruly!

If your landlord says yes, make sure that your pet is tired out from a long walk or trip to the park. You don’t want this tactic to be counterproductive if your pet is loud or unruly!

We’d love for you to meet . Let us know if you’re interested!
Save Resume

See some sample resumes.

Dog Resume Sample
Cat Resume Sample

Understanding Your Landlord

It makes sense that your landlord has concerns about having pets in their apartment. Apartment rentals are an investment, and they’re looking to protect themselves and their families from a large and unnecessary expense. By creating a pet resume, you’re trying to show your potential landlord that your pet will not cost their family unnecessary hardships. At the end of the day they are people too. These are their concerns and how you can prove to them that they don’t have to worry.


1. An rambunctious pet that disturbs other tenants.

  • Attach a copy of the returned security deposit from your last apartment as proof to your pet’s great apartment life.
  • Consider having your pet’s references write letters about your pet to include with your pet’s resume. Your landlord will probably still call the references, but the letters let your landlord know that these references are serious.
  • Attach copies of any training certificates you mentioned in your resume.
  • Offer to enroll your pet in any additional trainings your landlord may be preferential to.


2. They don’t want to be held liable.

Be aware of local restrictions. Some cities, counties, buildings and management companies ban certain breeds, like pit bulls. In the case of city and county regulations, this is a non-negotiable issue. Some management companies restrict breeds because of insurance company regulations; therefore, this rule isn’t flexible for them either.

If it’s a landlord specific restriction, there’s hope! Bring your pet to see the apartment or ask the landlord to schedule a meeting with your pet. Send the landlord a video of your pet being adorable, if that’s what it takes! Make sure that your landlord witnesses your pet’s great behavior. You may even be able to sidestep this issue if your pet’s breed is mixed, which many are.

You can offer to sign a liability agreement with your landlord to protect them in court in case your pet runs into trouble. If necessary, ask your landlord for a test-out term. If your pet doesn’t bother anyone in the first six months you’re living there, it probably won’t for the rest of the time either, so your pet can stay with you. If your pet breaks the rules beforehand, you will move out or find another place for it to stay until the end of your lease.


3. They want to protect their investment

  • Let your landlord know if you have renter’s insurance that covers pets. If you don’t have it, be sure to let them know if you’re willing to invest in it.
  • Offer to put down an additional pet deposit.
  • Offer to add extra rugs to the apartment to protect flooring.


4. A pet that will bring disease into their apartment.

  • Include a health certificate from the vet.
  • Attach copies of your vaccinations or offer to provide them.

Popular Locations for Pet-friendly Rent to Own Homes